TV movie written by native Oklahoman will premiere Saturday

Bryan Dick, a screenwriter from Oklahoma, wrote “Gone Missing,” Lifetime's “Movie of the Week” premiering Saturday.
BY RACHAEL CERVENKA rcervenka@opubco.com Published: June 14, 2013
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After years of juggling several miscellaneous jobs, working for big Hollywood names and putting his own screenwriting ambitions on the back burner, Woodward native Bryan Dick is at last getting his chance to shine.

A full-length film titled “Gone Missing,” starring actress Daphne Zuniga (“One Tree Hill,” “Melrose Place”), could be Dick's big game-changer.

The thriller chronicling the not-so-relaxing spring break of a mother and daughter premieres at 7 p.m. Saturday on Lifetime cable network. The storyline follows a mother, Zuniga, whose daughter goes missing while vacationing. Drama unfolds around the investigation into her disappearance.

“I think it kind of taps into an innate fear that we all have about losing loved ones and sort of the trauma that we go through with that,” Dick said. “That is what good suspense does, is tap into fears that we all have.”

As a high school freshman, Dick was exposed to screenwriting through his mother's humanities class. During this early stage in his writing, he fell in love with the work of Alfred Hitchcock, and this is perhaps why thriller films such as “Gone Missing” are slowly becoming his specialty.

Never stopped writing

It took Dick nearly 20 years to get to where he is now. Throughout his days in the Critical Studies program at the University of Southern California, Dick worked many glamorous and not-so-glamorous jobs, but always surrounded himself with movies; from cashiering at Blockbuster video stores to interning for Gray Frederickson, producer of “The Godfather” films.

“It's been a major ride, up and down,” he said.

However, following graduation, he was thrown onto the roller coaster called finding a real job, which is not a simple task in the movie industry. He held mundane jobs as a film development assistant and a restaurant host, neither furthering his career, but he never stopped writing.

“When I was working at the restaurant I would get home, put on a pot of coffee and write until 3:30, 4 in the morning,” Dick said.

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