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Oklahoma City RedHawks: Two Oklahoma City University softball players breaking ground on RedHawks' grounds crew

Danielle Fox and Kylee Rounsaville are the first two women to work for the RedHawks' grounds crew. The two Oklahoma City softball players are proud of their job, and proud to help lay the foundation for women in sports jobs.
BY RHIANNON WALKER, Staff Writer, rwalker@opubco.com Published: July 27, 2013
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photo - Groundskeepers Kylee Rounsaville , at left, and Danielle Fox pose for a photo in the in a storage area in right field before an Oklahoma City RedHawks at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark in Oklahoma City, Friday, July 26, 2013.  Kylee Rounsaville and Danielle Fox are the first female groundskeepers in the 16-year history of the Oklahoma City RedHawks.  Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman
Groundskeepers Kylee Rounsaville , at left, and Danielle Fox pose for a photo in the in a storage area in right field before an Oklahoma City RedHawks at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark in Oklahoma City, Friday, July 26, 2013. Kylee Rounsaville and Danielle Fox are the first female groundskeepers in the 16-year history of the Oklahoma City RedHawks. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

Danielle Fox walks through her house carrying a basket of laundry.

Before pouring detergent in the machine, she takes a moment to look over a few of the clothes, however. She holds up an Oklahoma City RedHawks grounds crew polo. The cotton blue fabric is drenched in sweat, and red dirt is smeared all over it, but Fox isn't disgusted by it at all.

As one of the first two women to work for the RedHawks' grounds crew in its 15-year history, she swells with pride when she wears the shirt.

Her legs as well as her black-and-yellow Nike sneakers are also covered by the clay, but Fox doesn't mind because the red dirt is a constant reminder that she's working her ultimate job.

“I have a lot of pride (telling people where I work,)” she said. “I have so much respect for the game of baseball, it being America's sport. To get to work at a Triple-A facility, I honestly think it's kind of like a dream job.”

The Detroit Tigers and Baltimore Orioles are the only Major League Baseball teams with women as their head groundskeepers, and seeing women working on grounds crews is still rare.

So when Oklahoma City University softball teammates Fox and Kylee Rounsaville prepare Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark's field, they are not only creating the perfect playing conditions for the players, but they're also laying down the foundation for other women to work on grounds crews in the future.

Rounsaville, the first woman to ever work on the RedHawks' grounds crew, was hired by head groundskeeper Monte McCoy in March, and says people still tell her how impressed they are with what she's doing.

“My favorite part is hearing the players from other teams saying that this is one of the nicest facilities that they get to play on,” Rounsaville said. “It's pretty cool knowing that I help keep the field the way it is.

“People still come up and shake my hand to this day, and they're like ‘I'm highly impressed with what you've done and how you're representing females and bringing them into this sports world.'”

A Mustang native, Rounsaville started her athletic career playing T-ball and baseball before moving on to softball.  

After being recruited by schools that included the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Marshall, the 21-year-old committed to OCU because she wanted to stay close to home and attend a small school.  

And as luck would have it, Rounsaville would learn about the RedHawks job when she was giving softball lessons to 11- and 12-year-old girls. McCoy's brother approached Rounsaville about helping him coach a 12-and-under softball team, but she explained it would be hard for her this summer because she needed a job.

He told her that his brother was the RedHawks' head groundskeeper, and he could get her the job.

In late March, the Stars' starting catcher began a sophisticated balancing act with her practice schedule and trips to Bricktown. Games were on Tuesdays and Thursdays, so when practice ended at 4:45 p.m., she'd make the 11-mintue trip from Ann Lacy Stadium to The Brick.

As a softball player, she always appreciates a well-kept field, but now Rounsaville has developed a greater appreciation for a field's maintenance.

“You just don't know how much effort is put into the field,” Rounsaville said. “I never knew there was so much work done on the field. I knew there was the simple dragging the field and watering and stuff like that, but I didn't know about ... all the stuff that goes on behind the scenes, that we don't see as people that get to watch.”

Rounsaville's first day started off slow. McCoy walked her through her tasks, and then she was directed out to the field and helped chalk the infield and outfield lines.

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