U.S. Supreme Court affirmative action ruling would have little impact in Oklahoma, officials say

Although Fisher v. Texas is one of the most highly anticipated and controversial cases to come before the court this year, it's expected to have minimal impact at Oklahoma's public colleges and universities, where a student's race isn't a factor in admissions.
by Silas Allen Modified: October 10, 2012 at 7:49 pm •  Published: October 11, 2012
Advertisement
;

A case that could decide what role a student's race may play in the college admissions process went before the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday.

Although Fisher v. Texas is one of the most highly anticipated and controversial cases to go before the court this session, it's expected to have minimal impact at Oklahoma's public colleges and universities, where a student's race isn't a factor in admissions.

A decision in the case is expected by July. That decision could determine what role, if any, race may play in the admissions process at publicly funded colleges and universities.

The suit was brought by a Texas woman who claimed she was denied admission into the University of Texas because she is white.

Andrea Noel Fisher, a white graduate of Steven F. Foster High School in Sugar Land, Texas, challenged the state university's admissions policy after she was rejected by the school in 2008. UT guarantees admission to students in the top 10 percent of their high school classes, but Fisher's 3.59 GPA was not enough.

The university also admits a certain number of other students, for whom race, leadership experience, socioeconomic status and other factors can provide an admissions advantage.

Fisher, who had a combined SAT score of 1180 out of 1600, was rejected. Fisher, now 22, subsequently enrolled at Louisiana State University and graduated in May.

In its 2003 decision in Grutter v. Bollinger, the court ruled that universities may consider race among other admissions factors when the universities had a compelling interest in promoting diversity.

Unlike UT, Oklahoma's public colleges and universities don't use race as a factor during the admissions process. Officials say that practice prevents difficult questions and criticism regarding the way universities pick their incoming freshman classes.


by Silas Allen
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Silas Allen is a news reporter for The Oklahoman. He is a Missouri native and a 2008 graduate of the University of Missouri.
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Former Millwood standout Josh Turner dismissed from Texas
  2. 2
    Nick Saban admits he was afraid of Santa Claus, wears a Luigi hat
  3. 3
    The Real Reason You're So Tired On Mondays
  4. 4
    What Not To Say To Someone Who Doesn't Drink
  5. 5
    Report: Texas RB Joe Bergeron 5th UT player dismissed in 2 days
+ show more