U.S. Supreme Court to hear arguments in Oklahoma-Texas water dispute

The outcome could influence Oklahoma City's ability to keep water flowing through the drought.
by William Crum Published: April 15, 2013
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Oklahoma City has long-standing permits for water from the Kiamichi and Muddy Boggy rivers. The water is pumped from southeast Oklahoma through the 50-year-old Atoka pipeline.

An application for more water from the Kiamichi would provide nearly enough to meet city needs for 2060, as projected in a 2009 study. That application is tied up in a separate lawsuit over tribal water rights.

Oklahoma City's lawyers say the water from southeastern Oklahoma “is a critical component of (Oklahoma City's) municipal water supply.”

Contrary to the Texas Regional Water District's claims, the lawyers say, reservoirs that store water for Oklahoma City were funded and authorized by Congress “for the express purpose of providing OKC with a municipal water supply.”

The case is Tarrant Regional Water District, A Texas State Agency v. Rudolph John Herrmann, et. al., No. 11-889.

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by William Crum
Reporter
OU and Norman High School graduate, formerly worked as a reporter and editor for the Associated Press, the Star Tribune in Minneapolis, and the Norman Transcript. Married, two children, lives in Norman.
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