Uinted Airlines pushes to better enforce carry-on bag rules

United passengers flying with oversized bags can have the suitcase checked for free at the gate, but those who get halted at security must now go back to the ticket counter and pay the airline’s $25 checked-luggage fee.
Published: March 5, 2014
Advertisement
;

United Airlines is getting tough on passengers with oversized carry-on bags, even sending some of them back to the ticket counter to check their luggage for a fee.

The Chicago-based airline has started a push to better enforce rules restricting the size of carry-on bags — an effort that will include instructing workers at security checkpoint entrances to eyeball passengers for bags that are too big.

In recent weeks, United has rolled out new bag-sizing boxes at most airports and sent an email to frequent fliers, reminding them of the rules. An internal employee newsletter called the program a “renewed focus on carry-on compliance.”

The size limits on carry-on bags have been in place for years, but airlines have enforced them inconsistently, rarely conducting anything beyond occasional spot checks.

United says its new approach will ensure that bags are reliably reviewed at the security checkpoint, in addition to the bag checks already done at gates prior to boarding.

People flying with oversized bags can have the suitcase checked for free at the gate, a longstanding practice. But those who get halted at the entrance to security must now go back to the ticket counter and pay the airline’s $25 checked-luggage fee.

Some travelers suggest the crackdown is part of a larger attempt by United to collect more fees. The airline says it’s simply ensuring that compliant passengers have space left for them in the overhead bins. In recent years, the last passengers to board have routinely been forced to check their bags at the gate because overhead bins were already full.

“The stepped-up enforcement is to address the customers who complained about having bags within the size limit and weren’t able to take them on the plane,” United spokesman Rahsaan Johnson said. “That is solely what this is about.”

It has nothing to do with revenue, Johnson said, adding that one non-compliant bag takes up the same space as two compliant ones.

But the airline is likely to benefit if more passengers are turned back at security.



(luggage) flight patterns

Airplane passengers are typically allowed one carry-on bag for the bin. The bag can be no larger than 9 inches by 14 inches by 22 inches. Fliers also can bring one personal item such as a purse or laptop bag that fits under the seat.

Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    The Kids Who Beat Autism
  2. 2
    Guess who NBC tapped to play 'Peter Pan' in its December live production
  3. 3
    The Scary Way Midlife Drinking Impacts Memory Later In Life
  4. 4
    Beyoncé, Jay Z carefully orchestrating splitting up as On the Run tour grinds to an end
  5. 5
    The Exhaustive List of Sharknado 2's OMG Moments
+ show more