UK sets out social media prosecution guidelines

Published on NewsOK Modified: December 18, 2012 at 8:02 pm •  Published: December 18, 2012
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LONDON (AP) — British government prosecutors have set out new guidelines to make it harder to bring legal cases against people who send offensive messages on Twitter and Facebook.

The guidelines, published Wednesday, come amid increasing criminal prosecutions against people who post online messages deemed indecent or menacing, and criticism that such cases are a threat to free speech. Civil rights campaigners have complained that British authorities have been too harsh with people who carelessly make insensitive comments online.

"These interim guidelines are intended to strike the right balance between freedom of expression and the need to uphold the criminal law," said Keir Starmer, the director of public prosecutions.

One of the most notorious of such cases was that of Paul Chambers, who was arrested by anti-terrorist police in 2010 a week after he joked on Twitter that he would "blow the airport sky high." He sent the tweet after he was angered that England's Robin Hood airport was closed and his flight was going to be delayed. Chambers was convicted and fined, but this year the High Court overturned his conviction.

Starmer acknowledged that prosecuting Chambers was a wrong "judgment call."

Hundreds of others — many young people — have been caught out, including a teenager who tweeted Olympic diver Tom Daley to tell him he had let his father down. The teenager was arrested but released with a harassment warning.

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