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University of Oklahoma's Research Campus sees booming growth

OU's Research Campus is home to seven buildings devoted to research, with two more facilities planned. But before those buildings opened, the area had sat unused for decades.
by Silas Allen Published: November 11, 2012
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— A decade ago, the parcel of land just southeast of the University of Oklahoma's Lloyd Noble Center was but an empty field.

Today, the area is home to a burgeoning community of university researchers, government agencies and private industry partners.

OU's Research Campus is home to seven buildings devoted to research, with two more facilities planned. But before those buildings opened, the area had sat unused for decades.

OU broke ground Oct. 30 on the next addition to the OU Research Campus, the $15 million Radar Innovations Lab. OU officials expect the laboratory to open in December 2013.

The new facility is at the center of the university's efforts to expand its radar program into other applications beyond predicting the weather. OU officials say it will include a number of features, such as a high-bay garage designed to accommodate taller radar trucks that are fitted for storm chasing.

Another building project in the Research Campus is in the final planning stages. Five Partners Place will be the fifth in a group of similarly named office buildings designed to house private companies that partner with the university in research projects. OU officials expect to break ground on the building this fall.

The two buildings will be the latest additions to an area of campus that has seen rapid growth in recent years. The university opened One Partners Place and the Stephenson Research and Technology Center, the first two buildings in the Research Campus, in 2004.

Since then, the campus has seen the construction of three more Partners Place buildings, the National Weather Center and the Stephenson Life Sciences Research Center, making the Research Campus one of the fastest-growing areas at OU.

Natural extension

The campus today differs somewhat from the plan university officials had initially laid out for the area, said Daniel Pullin, OU's vice president for strategic planning and economic development.

At first, when university officials mapped out plans for development in the area, they saw the campus as a natural extension of the university's research efforts, with space included for private and government programs, as well.

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by Silas Allen
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Silas Allen is a news reporter for The Oklahoman. He is a Missouri native and a 2008 graduate of the University of Missouri.
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