US House committee investigating GM recall

Published on NewsOK Modified: March 11, 2014 at 10:10 am •  Published: March 11, 2014
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DETROIT (AP) — A congressional committee is investigating the way General Motors and a federal safety agency handled a deadly ignition switch problem in compact cars.

House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton of Michigan says the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration received a large number of complaints about the problem during the past decade. But GM didn't recall the 1.6 million cars worldwide until last month.

Ignition switches on older-model Chevrolet Cobalts and five other GM models can shift from the "run" position to "accessory" or "off" without warning, shutting off the engine and turning off power-assisted steering and brakes. The problem also can stop the front air bags from inflating in a crash. GM says 13 deaths and 31 crashes have been linked to the problem.

Upton says the committee will seek information from the automaker and hold a hearing in the coming weeks. A Senate subcommittee hearing also is possible.

Congress passed legislation in 2000 requiring automakers to report safety problems quickly to NHTSA. The laws came after an investigation into a series of Ford-Firestone tire problems.

Upton said in a statement that the committee wants to know if GM or the agency missed something that could have flagged the problems sooner.

"If the answer is yes, we must learn how and why this happened, and then determine whether this system of reporting and analyzing complaints that Congress created to save lives is being implemented and working as the law intended," Upton said.

An Associated Press review of a NHTSA database found dozens of driver complaints about the problem, some as early as 2005. GM has admitted in documents filed with NHTSA that it knew of the problem in 2004.