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Utah's narrow medical marijuana program begins

Published on NewsOK Modified: July 8, 2014 at 4:16 pm •  Published: July 8, 2014
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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah has issued its first registration cards Tuesday morning under a limited medical marijuana program allowing those with severe epilepsy to possess a low-potency extract.

The extract, called cannabidiol, doesn't have the psychoactive properties that get users high and is believed by some to reduce severe seizures.

It can only be obtained from other states, as the program approved earlier this year by Republican Gov. Gary Herbert does not allow distribution of medical marijuana in Utah.

The program, which expires in 2016, is restricted to those with severe epilepsy for whom the regular treatments are not effective, and it requires a neurologist's consent to obtain and use the extract.

Annette Maughan of Cedar Hills said she was "thrilled beyond belief" after receiving a card for her 11-year-old son, Glenn, who has a form of epilepsy that causes him to have seizures about every 90 seconds that range from major to minor, barely detectable seizures.

If the cannabidiol could allow her son to have even 72 hours without a seizure, "that's a huge, huge thing for him," she said.

"I'm not looking for him to hang glide or race sports cars. Heck, if he'd even potty train, that's OK with me," she said. "As long as he can get back to enjoying what he used to enjoy when he was 3, that's really everything for me."

Janice Houston, the state registrar and director of the Utah Department of Health's records office, said Maughan was one of a handful who received cards Tuesday, while more applicants are expected later in the week and year.

The main producer of the extract, based in Colorado, has a waiting list with thousands of names and doesn't expect to have more supply until fall.

Because the cards are only good for a year, advocates and the Utah Department of Health expect many people will wait until later this year to apply.

"When I've talked with several families, there are several that just want to go ahead and get it as soon as possible," said Jennifer May with the Utah group Hope 4 Children with Epilepsy, which lobbied for the law. "My guess is that we'll have several by the end of the week that are getting theirs."

The cards require a $400 annual fee. The cost is high because the program has startup costs and only about 100 families are expected to participate, Houston said.

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