Value of scholarships a hot topic at Big 12 meetings

By DOUG TUCKER, AP Sports Writer Published: June 1, 2011
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“The reality of being able to do it, it's hard. Maybe 10 percent of athletic budgets are in the black. So if you go cost of living, that's another, let's say million dollars, that's got to come from somewhere. Probably got to come from the academic side. It's not a good time to take money from the academic side for athletes. The reality of making it happen, I think, is pretty hard to figure.”

Dodds does not see a majority of schools going for the idea.

“I think we'd vote for something to help kids,” he said. “A lot of people would. But I think most wouldn't because they don't have the resources. And you don't want to take money out of the academic side.”

Beebe said no one was thinking of raising the scholarship value only for football and men's basketball players.

“There was a recognition that you can't just do it in the revenue-producing sports without doing it at least with the same number of female student-athletes,” he said.

Dodds, who estimates it would cost the Longhorns about $1 million to take every scholarship to full cost of attendance, scoffs at the idea that it would hold down the sort of scandals which cost Ohio State football coach Jim Tressel his job this week.

“Absolutely not. If somebody's going to do that, they're going to do that,” he said.

The idea became a hot topic recently after the Big Ten and Southeastern Conferences raised the possibility.

“The Big Ten would be for it because they've got the Big Ten Network. They've got dollars,” Dodds said. “But probably 80 percent of institutions would have to go to the academic side to get the money. You have to vote something like this in, and I don't see how you'd get the votes.”