Washington residents rail against oil shipments

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 17, 2014 at 5:53 pm •  Published: June 17, 2014
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SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Numerous speakers told a state Senate committee Tuesday that they oppose the rapid increase in railcars carrying crude oil from the Bakken fields of North Dakota and Montana through the state.

The Senate Energy, Environment and Telecommunications Committee met in Spokane, a major railroad hub for the northern United States, to take testimony on a bill that seeks to improve the safety of those oil shipments.

But nearly all the members of the public who spoke attacked the measure as too friendly to the oil and railroad industries.

Numerous people referred to last year's explosion of a rail car in Quebec, Canada, that killed 47 people, and worried that could happen in Washington.

"I personally don't believe we should send these 'bomb cars' through our community of almost half a million people," said Mike Petersen of The Lands Council, a Spokane environmental group.

An explosion like the Quebec blast would be catastrophic in downtown Spokane, where elevated railroad tracks run near or adjacent to office towers, hotels and hospitals, speakers said.

But officials of the BNSF Railway noted there hasn't been a rail accident involving hazardous materials in the Spokane region in decades, and said rail traffic is getting safer.

Patrick Brady of BNSF said the railroad has had one flammable release this year in 900,000 shipments of hazardous material.

"It's pretty rare for them to occur," he said.

The oil boom in North Dakota and Montana has created a sharp increase in rail shipments to West Coast refineries and ports. There were no crude oil shipments by rail through the state in 2011, but that increased to 17 million barrels in 2013 and is projected to reach 55 million barrels this year.

That has raised concerns in communities across the state about a derailment and explosion in a populated area.

A bill to regulate crude oil shipments failed in the Legislature last year, but Senate Bill 6582 will be introduced in the next session. The measure calls for the state Department of Ecology to study the safety of the shipments. It also seeks to train emergency responders, and create caches of emergency gear in rail communities. It would be funded by an extension to rail of a 5-cents-per-barrel tax that currently applies only to oil shipments by sea.

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