Weight management and health lifestyles workshop set

BY GALE GOODNER, Oklahoma County OSU Cooperative Extension Service Modified: January 28, 2013 at 2:19 pm •  Published: January 28, 2013
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     The average American can gain as much as five pounds over the holidays due to all the overindulgence at parties, special dinners and other celebrations focusing on excessive food and drink.

     In Oklahoma, where the incidence of obesity and being overweight continues to climb among residents, controlling our weight by adopting a healthier lifestyle is no doubt the number one goal people make in honor of the new year.

     To help residents find the information and support they need to fulfill this resolution, the Oklahoma County OSU Cooperative Extension Service will hold two “Weight Management and Healthy Lifestyles” workshops on Tuesday, February 12.

     “Despite all the different kinds of diets and weight-loss strategies that are out there, the science of weight-loss is actually fairly simple,” explained Amanda Horn, a Registered Dietitian and the Family and Consumer Sciences Educator for the Oklahoma County OSU Cooperative Extension Service who will be teaching the workshops.

     People will gain a pound if they eat 3,500 more calories than their body needs for fuel.  At the same time, people will lose a pound when they eat 3,500 less than their body needs for energy, Horn stressed.

     “Counting calories can be very important to someone trying to lose weight,” Horn said.  “At the same time, exercise that helps the body burn extra calories and can promote a healthier metabolism overall where the body burns more calories in general can also be instrumental.”



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