What consumers can expect from AT&T, DirecTV deal

Customers would bundle mobile phone and TV bills together if AT&T Inc.’s proposed $48.5 billion acquisition of DirecTV is approved by regulators.
By RYAN NAKASHIMA, Associated Press Published: May 19, 2014

Ready to bundle your mobile phone and TV bills together? That is one of the changes customers can expect if AT&T Inc.’s proposed $48.5 billion acquisition of DirecTV is approved by regulators.

Here’s a quick look at the consumer impact of the deal, based on information provided by the companies:

Q. How will my bill change?

A. For the time being, not at all. The deal is subject to government approval in both the U.S. and Latin America. Until the transaction is approved, the companies will operate separately. AT&T and DirecTV expect to close the deal within 12 months.

After that, however, the companies say a single bill for mobile phone, Internet service and TV can be offered in certain areas.

Q. Will prices rise?

A. That is a concern when competition is eliminated. AT&T offers its U-verse video in 22 states, while DirecTV is offered nationwide. The overlap accounts for 25 percent of all U.S. households.

Competition helps keep prices to consumers low. Just look at the deals that companies like Dish offer to steal you away from your current TV provider. Or think of how easy it is to get a discount on TV or Internet service from your cable provider when AT&T improves Internet speeds in your area. The reverse is true when competition goes away.

To ameliorate the harm to consumers by reducing the number of TV competitors in many markets from four to three, the companies vowed to offer DirecTV on a stand-alone basis for at least three years at nationwide prices that won’t rise or fall depending on local market conditions.

AT&T will also offer stand-alone Internet service for three years, so consumers who don’t want to pay for TV service can use video providers like Netflix or Hulu.

DirecTV never offered Internet service, so those prices won’t be directly impacted by the takeover.

Q. Will there be consumer benefits?

A. AT&T says it will use cost savings — targeted at $1.6 billion a year — to roll out high-speed broadband to 15 million more homes, mostly in rural areas, within four years. That could improve speeds for people in areas with poor Internet connectivity, and depending on where the rollout occurs, create competition for broadband in areas where consumers don’t have many options.

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