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What’s the point with low-point beer?

by Dave Cathey Modified: February 25, 2009 at 10:28 am •  Published: February 25, 2009
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Alert! National Beer Day is Sunday. If your favorite brew’s first name isn’t Natty, Bud or Adolph, you’d better get to the liquor store.

That’s because in Oklahoma, grocery stores are only allowed to sell 3.2 beer and no wine.

Of course, we’re not the only state with such laws. Pennsylvania and Utah have restrictive laws on sales in grocery stores. Wyoming, which has a population a little more than half the size of the Tulsa metro, also has markets bereft of beer or wine.

But let’s focus on progress rather than complaints.

Oklahoma was born a dry state. In the 1930s, voters embraced "non-intoxicating” beer, or beer that is less than 3.2-percent alcohol.

We changed the name in 1995 to low-point beer when it was determined that "nonintoxicating beer” was indeed intoxicating people enough to be responsible for 70 percent of state traffic deaths. (Did it really take that long to figure it out?)

Quantity, not quality
Some have said the content is negligible.
by Dave Cathey
Food Editor
The Oklahoman's food editor, Dave Cathey, keeps his eye on culinary arts and serves up news and reviews from Oklahoma’s booming food scene.
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