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Why Carl’s Jr. is making it hard on us parents

Our kids come to us naïve and sweet and innocent, and we want to do all we can to protect that innocence as long as we can, but it makes it hard when a company, or in this case a restaurant, tries to find a way around that.
Lindsay Ferguson, FamilyShare Modified: August 28, 2014 at 6:36 pm •  Published: August 29, 2014
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You may or may not yet have seen the post gone viral by popular blogger Greg Trimble, A Letter From a Dad to Carl’s Jr. and the Women in Their Commercials. If you haven’t had a chance to read it, you should. Take a minute to jump over there, and then join me back here when you’re finished.

My first reaction when I saw the headline come up on my Facebook feed was, "Here we go with an overly conservative opinion about the media." And honesty, if I would have read the article a few years back I probably would have thought it was a little overboard. But now I have kids. Kids around the same ages as this father’s. And I get it. I totally get it!

Our kids come to us naïve, sweet and innocent, and we want to do all we can to protect that innocence as long as we can. Which we should. It is our job as parents to protect our children, physically, emotionally, and mentally.

So we come up with ways to be careful. We use Internet filters; we make sure we don’t subscribe to cable channels that might show inappropriate movies or TV programs; we use parental blocks on our cable and Netflix subscriptions to be safe; and so on. It’s not because we are being paranoid or prudish, it’s because we’re trying to keep them viewing age appropriate material. Trying to protect their young minds from images and ideas that are beyond their years and will only leave them confused and thinking about certain things much younger than they need to be.

But it makes it hard when companies try to find a way around that. They know that sex sells, and they don’t care that they are showing these ads on channels and at times that kids will likely be watching. Their attitude seems to be, "If it brings more money in the end, it’s not our problem." They leave it to us parents to sit down with our wide-eyed young children and try to explain something to them that’s way beyond their years -- which will probably only leave them more confused. If they happen to be the curious type, they will probably try to find ways they can find out more about it.

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