Why Dolphins tight end Charles Clay credits Tulsa and Gus Malzahn for his versatility

Because Charles Clay stuck to his guns and was willing to play at a lower-profile school, the former University of Tulsa standout has developed into one of the NFL’s most versatile tight ends.
by Michael Baldwin Published: August 30, 2014
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photo - New England Patriots free safety Devin McCourty, right, breaks up a pass intended for Miami Dolphins tight end Charles Clay (42) in the first half of an NFL football game on Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
New England Patriots free safety Devin McCourty, right, breaks up a pass intended for Miami Dolphins tight end Charles Clay (42) in the first half of an NFL football game on Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

Because Charles Clay stuck to his guns and was willing to play at a lower-profile school, the former University of Tulsa standout has developed into one of the NFL’s most versatile tight ends.

The Little Rock (Ark.) product was never highly recruited, but Miami and a few other colleges offered a scholarship if he would play linebacker or safety. Clay felt his best attributes were on the offensive side.

Following a remarkable TU career that flew under the radar, Clay last season was one of only 10 NFL tight ends to accumulate more than 750 receiving yards.

“We’re very fortunate to have a player like Charles Clay, we really are,” said Dolphins coach Joe Philbin. “He can do so much. He catches the ball well and has a little slip-and-slide to him. He can blow by a guy or cut underneath him and go over the top. He’s got a little shake. He can do a lot.”

Three years ago, Clay had to sweat out the day NFL teams are required to trim the roster to 53 players. When cut-down arrived on Saturday, Clay’s role was more than secure. He is viewed as one of the Miami Dolphins’ top weapons, a player they make sure to include in every game plan, a role he began to embrace at Tulsa.

“(Current Auburn coach) Gus Malzahn was our offensive coordinator that first season,” Clay said. “He asked me what position I wanted to play. I told him I just wanted to contribute but I’d like to have the ball come my way at least a couple of times a game.”

The ball came Clay’s way dozens of times. He finished his career with 189 receptions for 2,544 yards and 28 touchdowns. He also compiled 179 rushing attempts for 911 yards, a solid 5.1 yards-per-carry average.

“From Day 1, Coach Malzahn was really big on, ‘The more you can do the better it is for you and the team,’” Clay said. “I played a lot of different positions that year, which has really helped me in the NFL.”

Clay even played some defense at Tulsa. He appeared in 53 games with the Golden Hurricane and made 43 starts, at times playing tailback, fullback, wide receiver, tight end, linebacker, defensive end and was TU’s “Wildcat quarterback.”

The vast majority of his snaps were on offense, but it was his versatility that convinced the Dolphins he was worth taking a flyer on with a sixth-round pick in the 2011 draft.

“He’s one of those players who’s one of the hardest-working guys on the team,” Philbin said. “Football is very important to him. You can’t have enough players like that on your team. Plus, he’s got good skills. He’s a hard guy to cover.”

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by Michael Baldwin
Reporter
Mike Baldwin has been a sports reporter for The Oklahoman since 1982. Mike graduated from Okmulgee High School in 1974 and attended Oklahoma Christian University, graduating with a journalism degree in 1978. Mike's first job was sports editor...
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