Widow of Fort Hood soldier hopes Oklahoma bill will cut tax debt

An Oklahoma state representative drafts legislation to give a tax break to the surviving spouse of a person killed during an act of violence occurring within a federal military installation that could be classified as “terrorism” or “combat related.”
By BAILEY ELISE McBRIDE, Associated Press Published: March 26, 2014
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The widow of a soldier killed in the Fort Hood shooting could get relief from a $6,000 tax bill under a measure Oklahoma legislators are considering that would grant some families benefits similar to those given after acts of terrorism.

Jennifer Hunt, 30, had been married just short of three months when her husband, Jason, was killed in the rampage at Fort Hood on Nov. 5, 2009, when a U.S. Army major fatally shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others.

Though some consider the shooting an act of terrorism, the Defense Department classified it as an act of workplace violence — which means family members are not entitled to the same federal benefits as survivors of an act of terrorism. Late last year, the U.S. Army began an investigation into whether it should indeed be classified as terrorism so victims would be eligible for benefits or to receive the Purple Heart.

Hunt said she was misinformed at the time of her husband’s death and believed that she qualified for a property tax exemption granted to survivors of terrorism. But this year, she was notified that she was ineligible for the benefit and received a $6,000 bill for back taxes.

“I was ready to hand over my entire life savings,” Hunt said. “When a military person dies, most people look at you and think you must be rolling in the cash now. My husband split the life insurance policy he had 50/50 between me and his parents, so I paid off our house and my college debt, and I don’t have anything left after that. The $200 a month we get from the military will make us or break us.”