Wie in the spotlight again as a Solheim pick

Published on NewsOK Modified: August 14, 2013 at 6:03 pm •  Published: August 14, 2013
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PARKER, Colo. (AP) — Michelle Wie hasn't won a tournament in three years. She didn't come close to earning a spot on the Solheim Cup. Being a captain's pick for the second time on the last three American teams stood out even more this year because one of the players left out won on the LPGA Tour this year.

This would seem to be a good time to do whatever she can to blend in at Colorado Golf Club.

Except for the socks.

Wie added her own touch to the U.S. uniform of a khaki skirt, red shirt and a blue cap. She showed up on the practice range with knee-high socks of red-and-white stripes capped off by a thick blue stripe with white stars.

"It's a bit patriotic," Wie said Wednesday. "I just kind of accumulate things over the year. I see things and I'm like, 'Oh, that would be great for Solheim Cup.' And I just brought them out."

It's far more important that she bring out her very best game as the Americans try to stay perfect on home soil and win back the Solheim Cup from Europe.

U.S. captain Meg Mallon met with Wie at St. Andrews after the Women's British Open to tell her she was on the team. The next thing she told Wie — after the 23-year-old from Hawaii stopped crying — was to not think of herself as a wild-card selection, but one of 12.

"It's tough being a captain's pick," Mallon said. "There's a lot of pressure that players put on themselves being a pick."

Then again, that's a big reason why she took Wie.

Few other golfers have received so much attention for winning so little. Wie first was recognized in golfing circles when she was a 12 and blasted 270-yard tee shots during a Pro-Junior event at the Sony Open alongside PGA Tour players. Scrutiny followed a short time later, and it has been relentless.

Some of it was grounded in jealously. Without having won a tournament, Wie still attracted the largest galleries and the richest endorsement contracts. Some of it was grounded in reality. Wie spent her teen years trying to play against the men — PGA Tour events, even U.S. Open qualifying — without ever showing she could beat the women.

If there is additional pressure as a captain's pick, who better to handle it?

"She lives on this stage almost every day that she plays," Mallon said. "So walking into this environment is not going to affect her. I needed another player like that on the team. I had three rookies already. And like I said earlier, do I want five to six birdies a day at home sitting on the couch? So for me, that was a pretty easy decision."

The hard part falls to Wie.

She has a 4-3-1 record in two appearances, including a 3-0-1 mark in her debut in 2009 outside Chicago when she also was a captain's pick. Wie went 1-3 two years ago in Ireland, losing to Suzann Pettersen in singles on the 18th hole in a European victory.

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