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With recent ruling, Supreme Court gives Christian college the Hobby Lobby treatment

It was Thursday when the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that an evangelical college in Illinois didn't need to follow the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive coverage requirement, as long as it clarifies that it has a religious objection.
Herb Scribner, Deseret News Modified: July 4, 2014 at 10:45 am •  Published: July 5, 2014
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The legacy of the Hobby Lobby decision is still trickling through American politics.

On Thursday, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that an evangelical college in Illinois did not need to follow the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive coverage requirement, as long as it clarifies that it has a religious objection, Politico reported.

Wheaton College doesn’t provide access to birth control directly, Politico reported, so employees and students of the school won’t be affected heavily.

Wheaton will “avoid filling out a government document that the college says would violate its religious beliefs,” The Associated Press reported. The school “does not have to fill out the contested form while its case is on appeal but can instead write the Department of Health and Human Services declaring that it is a religious nonprofit organization and making its objection to emergency contraception.”

Jennifer Haberkorn of Politico noted that this may reflect an issue that the Supreme Court will deal with in the fall.

“The justices said they would block the policy in Wheaton’s case until the courts determine whether the coverage requirement is valid for religious institutions and nonprofits — the issue that is likely to return to the high court this fall,” Haberkorn wrote.

The female justices of the Supreme Court — Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor — all dissented on the case. Sotomayor specifically spoke out against the court’s decision.

“Those who are bound by our decisions usually believe they can take us at our word,” wrote Sotomayor in her dissent, Time magazine reported. “Not so today.”