Women a rare commodity in Oklahoma Legislature

Oklahoma has a female governor and was the first in the nation to elect a woman to statewide political office, but when it comes to electing women to the Legislature, the state ranks among the worst in the nation.

By SEAN MURPHY, AP Published: November 22, 2012
Advertisement
;

Oklahoma has a female governor and was the first in the nation to elect a woman to statewide political office, but when it comes to electing women to the Legislature, the state ranks among the worst in the nation.

Only 12.8 percent of Oklahoma's 149 state lawmakers are women, ranking the state 48th in the nation based on membership before the 2012 elections, according to the Center for American Women and Politics. Oklahoma's ranking is unlikely to move as a result of this year's elections, since there were no net gains for women in the Legislature, which now has four women in the 48-member Senate and 15 females in the 101-member House.

“Obviously, given Mary Fallin is governor, it's not that voters won't elect a woman to office,” said Sara Jane Rose, the president and founder of Sally's List, an organization dedicated to electing progressive women to office in Oklahoma. “It's just that women haven't been running.

“If you sit at the right angle in the Senate gallery, you can't even see any women on the floor. I have no aspirations to run for office, but if I did, I would feel a bit overwhelmed by the lack of women down there.”

Oklahoma was assured its first female governor in 2010 after Fallin won the Republican nomination for governor and former Lt. Gov. Jari Askins secured the Democratic nod. Oklahoma has three other female statewide elected officials, all Republicans: State Superintendent of Public Instruction Janet Barresi and Corporation Commissioners Dana Murphy and Patrice Douglas.

Oklahoma also has a history of electing women to major posts. In 1907 — before women could even vote — Oklahoma became the first state in the nation to elect a woman to statewide office when Kate Barnard was picked for Charities and Corrections commissioner. And in 1920, Oklahoma Republican Alice Mary Roberts became just the second woman in the country elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. Also, former Cherokee Nation Chief Wilma Mankiller was the first female chief of the Oklahoma-based tribe, a position she held from 1985 to 1995.

State Sen. A.J. Griffin, who was elected to her Senate seat during a special election earlier this year, said she believes part of the hindrance for women is a financial obstacle for professional women who are more likely to seek office.

| |

Advertisement


Trending Now



AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Former OU coach Sunny Golloway goes off at Auburn
  2. 2
    Chelsea Clinton Is Pregnant
  3. 3
    Tulsa World: Missouri’s Frank Haith positioned to become TU’s basketball coach
  4. 4
    Oklahoma football: Peyton Manning stops by Sooners film session
  5. 5
    VIDEO: A look at the Air Jordan XX9 in Thunder colors
+ show more