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Woolly mammoth tooth found in New Hampshire

Published on NewsOK Modified: August 2, 2014 at 8:18 am •  Published: August 2, 2014
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photo - In this photo released by Plymouth State University, biology professor Fred Prince displays a fragment of a wooly mammoth tooth at the college in Plymouth, N.H., that he discovered in April 2014 in New Hampshire's Pemigewasett River Valley. The fossil is the first confirmed evidence of the prehistoric mammal living within the state of New Hampshire. (AP Photo/Plymouth State University)
In this photo released by Plymouth State University, biology professor Fred Prince displays a fragment of a wooly mammoth tooth at the college in Plymouth, N.H., that he discovered in April 2014 in New Hampshire's Pemigewasett River Valley. The fossil is the first confirmed evidence of the prehistoric mammal living within the state of New Hampshire. (AP Photo/Plymouth State University)

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A Plymouth State University biology professor has found the first — and maybe the second — woolly mammoth tooth in New Hampshire.

Fred Prince was fishing in Campton 10 years ago when he found and discarded what he now believes was a prehistoric elephant tooth. It wasn't until he started researching the animals and bought a partial molar from the Netherlands last winter that he realized what he had found. He vowed to find another, and that's exactly what he did in April, searching for just a few hours about 2 miles from his first discovery.

A national expert confirmed that it was a partial molar. Such fossils are rare in New England, though a tooth was dredged from the ocean off the coast of Rye last year.