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Your Money: Employer contributions should not count toward savings goal

Dave Ramsey: Should employer contributions count toward the recommended 15 percent that should be set aside for retirement?
BY DAVE RAMSEY, For The Oklahoman Published: November 18, 2013
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DEAR DAVE: Do employer contributions count toward the 15 percent you recommend putting into retirement?

Brian

DEAR BRIAN: Employer contributions do not count toward the 15 percent I recommend setting aside for retirement. It's nice if you work for a company that offers perks like that, but I want you putting 15 percent of your money into retirement.

Baby Step 4 of my plan says to put 15 percent of your income into retirement accounts. The first thing you should put money into is a matching retirement account. If you've got a 401(k), a Roth 401(k) or a 403(b) and your employer offers a match, you should do that up to the match before anything else.

Let's say your employer will match 3 percent. Since the goal is 15 percent, you've still got some work to do. You've got 3 percent of your own money already tied up for retirement, so then you could look at a Roth IRA. If the Roth plus what you invested previously to get the match doesn't equal 15 percent, you could then look at a 403(b) or go back to your 401(k) to hit the 15 percent mark.

Whatever your company matches, whatever its pension may be or even military retirement does not enter into the equation. I want your money in your name. If your company goes broke and you have a company pension, you get nothing. But if you have a 401(k) and your company dies, it's in your name and you don't lose it. You put it there, and you own it.

Are you getting the picture, Brian? I want you to control your destiny.

DEAR DAVE: What are some good ways to teach a 13-year-old kid about giving versus getting during the holiday season?

Phillip

DEAR PHILLIP: One of the best things you can do is simply talk about it a lot. Kids are bombarded with messages about how important they are, and how they should always have what they want.

It's OK to have some stuff, but advertising and other marketing messages in today's culture can make them think it's all about them. It can lead kids to believe the axis of the world runs through the tops of their little heads.

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